Tony Parsons Books In Order

Publication Order of Harry Silver Books

Man and Boy (1991) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Man and Wife (2002) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Men from Boys (2010) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Max Wolfe Books

The Murderbag aka The Murder Man (2014) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Slaughter Man (2015) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Dead Time (2015) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Hanging Club (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Fresh Blood (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Standalone Novels

One for My Baby (2001) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Family Way (2004) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Stories We Could Tell (2005) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
My Favourite Wife (2008) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Starting Over (2009) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Catching the Sun (2012) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Collections

Departures (2011) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Non Fiction Books

The Boy Looked at Johnny (with Julie Burchill) (1978) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Big Mouth Strikes Again (2004) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
On Life, Death and Breakfast (2012) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

A British journalist and an author of numerous best-selling novels, Tony Parsons was born in 1953 in Romford, Essex. He is best known for writing novels concerning the troubles of men in their thirties. Before embarking on a successful authorial and journalistic career, Parsons worked a series of unskilled jobs, the most notable of which is the position of computer operator in an insurance company. His next job as a punk music journalist in New Musical Express yielded an unexpected outcome, as it was there that he met his first wife, Julie Burchill. The couple separated in 1984, leaving Parsons with the duty to take care of their only son. This experience profoundly affected the young author, ultimately helping him shape his most celebrated novel into existence.

After the years at NME, Parsons’ subsequent journalistic career included the writing for The Daily Telegraph. After that, he spent 18 years writing columns for Daily Mirror, before he settled to write for The Sun, where he is still employed. Parsons currently lives in London with his second wife, Yuriko, with whom he has a daughter Jasmine.

Tony Parsons the author had his first novel published in his early twenties. ‘The Kids’ it was called, and it dealt with the subject of growing up in the society of his time, along with all the perils that such society posed. His own words later revealed that he was resolute to, if he got any of his novels published, make his living as a writer. And it happened, just not as smoothly as he might have wished. At first he struggled as a freelancer, but then, after the years of limited success during which he wrote a biography of George Michael, came the crucial 1999, the year in which Parsons published his most celebrated novel – ‘Man and Boy’.

Somewhat autobiographical in nature, ‘Man and Boy’, dedicated to Parson’s mother who had deceased not long before the book’s publication, managed to reach the top of The Sunday Times’ best-seller list. The novel, the first in a series of three, revolves around a 30-years-old Harry Silver, who, sleeping with another woman, finds himself in a hopeless situation where the world seems to be collapsing under his feet. His wife Gina walks out on him, he loses his job, and is left to take care of their 4-year-old son. As the story goes on, we see Harry becoming more conscious of what it means to be a father. But just as he was starting to get his grips on fatherhood, Gina returns from a long trip, and this time she is not alone. Harry is furious, feeling cast out, betrayed; and thus infuriated, threatens to settle the matter of custody in court. But that never comes to fruition; Harry eventually learns what love is all about; he learns that if he truly loves Gina, he has to let her go. This novel, by far the author’s most famous, presents an engaging exploration into the intricacies of fatherhood. Harry’s relationship with his son is somewhat inversely mirrored in the relationship he has with his ageing father. Just as he learns to be a father, he also learns what it means to be a son. Parsons’ first novel in the trilogy proves to be an enduring success, winning the British Book of the Year Award in 2001.

After the success of his ‘Man and Boy’, Parsons wrote a sequel to it, called ‘Man and Wife’. The second book in a series follows the footsteps of the same Harry Silver, only this time dealing with different problems altogether. Harry, now married to his second wife, Cyd, has to contend with all the roles that life has thrust upon him. He has to be the father to his son Pat and his stepdaughter Peggy; he has to be the husband to a beautiful, career-minded Cyd; he has to contend with a fact that his former wife Gina wants to move away to another country taking their son with her; and on top of that, Harry’s mother, who has been his comfort throughout the tough years, battles the breast cancer. Too much for one man to handle indeed. The situation complicates further when Harry meets a young woman who catches his attention, again. Only this time the young woman is enamored with Harry’s son Pat! Now it is up to Harry to untangle the web of his emotions, a process that may provide self-knowledge, just as it may doom him for good. ‘Man and Wife’, among other things, is a story about family; about many of the possible relations a family might have. It is also the story about modern dilemmas a human being might face, and the consequences that may follow from the choices. Parsons concluded the trilogy with the novel ‘Men from the Boys’, published in 2010.

The author’s trip into the crime genre produced yet another notable series, the one that deals with the life of detective Max Wolfe. The two books from this series include ‘The Murder Bag’ and the ‘Slaughter Man’, both of which led to a commercial and critical acclaim. The first book in the series paints the portrait of one Max Wolfe, who, having recently arrived to a new Homicide division, follows the bloody trail of a killer. As the task proves to be tougher than anticipated, Alex is, at least at first, unmindful that his life, along the lives of the ones he loves, might be in danger.

Parson’s journalistic writings did not go without some controversy. The series of papers that dealt with the disappearance of young Madeleine McCann from a beach in Portugal attached the label of xenophobia to his name. But even the record number of complaints did not stop Parsons to write a sequel in Daily Mirror called ‘Oh Up Yours Senor’. This paper was aimed at the Portuguese ambassador in Britain, and Parsons did not spare harsh words in it. Another source of controversy is Parson’s open loathing of tattoos. He thinks them distasteful, believes them to be a vile symptom of the general decline. Indeed, Parsons never shied away from expressing his opinion, however unpopular it may be, just as he rarely wrote a novel that did not burst with his distinct voice.

Book Series In Order » Authors » Tony Parsons