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Annabel Lyon Books In Order

Publication Order of Edie Books

All-Season Edie (2008)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Encore Edie (2011)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Standalone Novels

The Golden Mean (2009)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Sweet Girl (2012)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Consent (2020)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Collections

Oxygen (2000)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Henry Kreisel Memorial Lecture Books

Sasquatch at Home (By:Eden Robinson) (2011)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Imagining Ancient Women (2012)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Anthologies

Margaret Atwood Presents: Stories by Canada’s Best New Women Writers(1987)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Annabel Lyon
Annabel Lyon is a literature and fiction author best known for her short story collection named Oxygen. Thanks to this short-fiction, this Canadian author was nominated for ReLit and Gleed awards. The Anthology has also appeared in numerous publications, including Write Turns and Toronto Life. With a background in creative writing, the talented author is able to draw you in and keep you reading. When she is not writing her novels, Lyon relishes contributing to The Globe, Vancouver Sun, and Mail, among other publications. Lyon currently lives in Vancouver, where she enjoys writing full time.

The Golden Mean
The Golden Mean tells the story of Aristotle and his life as King Philp’s sons’ tutor. Aristotle and the King had known each other in their childhood. When the King orders Aristotle to Macedonia, he is left with no choice but to obey. Even though tutoring King Philip’s adolescent sons sounded like a decent job, Aristotle had been looking forward to succeeding Plato and becoming the next leader in the Academy in Athens. Aristotle’s tutoring job would have its fair share of challenges. One of Phillip’s sons was mentally disabled, and the one who seemed bright was torn between bowing to the pressures of society and making the best out of his keen mind.

In the beginning, Aristotle hoped that the tutoring job would only last for a short duration. However, thanks to his curious nature, he is happy to keep tutoring his young students for as long as it would take. Aristotle takes a particular interest in Alexander, who appeared to have a questioning mind and a kindred spirit. Alexander is destined to be a warrior, but his tutor feels he is capable of so much more. Aristotle will have a hard time matching his innovative ideas against the birthright Alexander is expected to follow. At some point, Aristotle has to encourage Alexander to balance both. Aristotle also has to think about his ambitions and see how to influence Philip to accommodate them.

The more Alexander’s position as his father’s heir strengthens, the more Aristotle’s teachings become irrelevant. The young man seems keen to expand his empire, and while he honored his tutor, his instructions were often unheeded. Lyon narrates how Aristotle’s genius touched Alexander and the impact these two men had on the world. Told in Aristotle’s voice, this detailed historical fiction piece is so well written it is hard to differentiate fact from fiction. However, the writing is simple, and the story is straightforward, so it is easy to follow all that is happening from start to finish.
The Golden Mean follows the life of Aristotle as the tutor to the King’s sons and his relationship to the prince who wept when he ran out of land to conquer. This story also touches on the relationship Aristotle had with King Phillip of Macedon, his wife, and the slaves who worked for the royal family. While a lot has been written about Aristotle, this book gives you a new perspective on the man and his role in history.

The Sweet Girl
The Sweet Girl tells the story of Pythias, Aristotle’s daughter. Pythias did not stand out in the looks department, but she had a mind so brilliant her father regarded her as his brightest student. Considering her father was a genius, this acknowledgment must have meant a lot to the young girl. Not one to resist a strong mind, Aristotle dotted on his daughter and enjoyed sharing his wisdom with her. When Alexander the Great died, Aristotle and his family had to move from Athens to a small seaside town to escape all the hostility. However, misfortunes followed the family, and Aristotle died after settling his family in their new home. Soon after, Pythia’s stepmother and the woman who had raised her since she was four was chased away, and the young woman was left to confront life on her own.

As the daughter of Aristotle, Pythias had been shielded from the outside world. Though she was born in a society that believed a woman belonged in the kitchen, Pythias had enjoyed an excellent education. She also had access to the luxuries in the palace. After her father’s death, Pythias will quickly realize that her world lacked logic, and most of the people around her were slaves to superstitions. Now orphaned and with a rebellious household to manage, Pythias must be courageous to seek refuge in the least expected places. How will she survive all the betrayal in a society that believes she is supposed to obey and hope that she will get a man to marry her?

This story was set in the 4th century, and it follows Pythias through her teenage into her 20s. While it may seem that she lived well, her life was mostly unfair. Since she is a woman, society expected her to be veiled, chaste, and silent even though she was one of the most outstanding minds ever born. This honest and emotive story takes us through Pythias’ struggle for survival and attempts at happiness later in life. Her life alone starts on such a low note, but it is admirable how much effort she puts into reestablishing a decent life. While little is known about Aristotle’s daughter, Lyon has done a good job of merging facts and fiction to create a compelling story.

The Sweet Girl is a beautiful novel about a brilliant girl and her challenges growing up. Her coming-of-age story is fascinating, and the author has done the narration so well you will not want to put the book down. The author introduces us to Pythias, a girl who enjoys her father’s protection, to a polite yet determined young lady who owns her decisions, voice, and agency. Curious to see how her life turns out. Just keep reading, and you will be amazed by the young lady’s transformation. This book is perfect If you are in the mood for a well-crafted historical fiction story about a strong woman and the hard choices life forced her to take.

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