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Bernhard Schlink Books In Order

Publication Order of Gerhard Self Books

Self's Punishment (2004) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Self's Deception (2007) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Self's Murder (2008) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Standalone Novels

The Reader (1997) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Homecoming (2008) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Guilt About the Past (2009) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Gordian Knot (2009) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Weekend (2010) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Woman on the Stairs (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Bernhard Schlink is a published German author. His book The Reader was adapted into a feature film that was released in 2008. He wrote The Other Man, which was adapted into a movie starring Liam Neeson, and Girl with Lizard. He was born July 6, 1944.

He was a jurist in Germany, something that has helped further inform his writing. He first became a judge in 1988. He has since served as a professor at Humboldt University teaching law since 2006.

Schlink first became a published author with Flights of Love, a collection of stories. It came out in 2001. He has also delved into non-fiction as well, publishing his book Der Vorleser in 1995. The title translates to ‘The Reader’, and is a semi-autobiographical novel.

It was a best seller in his Germany and subsequently America. It did quite well and its popularity led to the novel being translated into many languages. It was also a landmark moment as it was the first ever German book to make it to the N.Y.Times’ number one spot on its best selling books list.

He is also quite well known for his detective novels that feature a man character by the name of Selb. The word in German stands for self, so it is a knowing play on words. The series outside of Germany is known by the name of the Gerhard Self series. This fictional series kicked off in 2004 with the debut of the first novel, titled Self’s Punishment. The sequel came out in 2007 and in 2008 Self’s Murder came out, making the series a trilogy.

Self’s Punishment is the first novel in the Self series. This is where readers get to meet the main character of Gerhard Self for the first time. Gerhard has always worked in the judicial system and when he was younger, he actually was a Nazi prosecutor. He thought that it was a noble calling to do his part.

But then after the war, Self found himself blocked out from operating within the confines of the judicial system. As a result, he was forced to move into another job field. It was as a result of his black balling that Self decided that he was going to become a private investigator as a way to make his living. It wasn’t all that different and would be within his skill set to do that job, so why not?

Even though Self is looking forward to testing his mettle in something new, he has never been able to forget the part that he played in committing evil. He’s getting older, too. Now he has a new case after being contacted by a friend from childhood. The friends hires him in order to help him find a hacker that has managed to get into the computer system of a chemical plant in the Rhineland.

It seems like the case is going to be straight forward enough, but sometimes the simplest of cases have a way of turning complicated. Sure enough, Self quickly finds that his hacking quest has turned into a case that is involving murder. He was not counting on that happening, but it doesn’t surprise him.

Now he is getting involved in something that is turning out to be a bigger beast than he bargained for. As he goes into the secrets of Germany from the past and starts to get closer to corporate secrets, is he in over his head? These companies have a lot of power and do not want their secrets to get out. They are hidden there with the skeletons of countless dead people, and only a few know the truth.

If you love action or adventure, then this thrilling crime fiction novel might just be for you! Want to find out whether this private eye is able to crack the case? Then pick up the exciting first novel from a German writer that is so good, he’s become a best seller.

Self’s Deception is the thrilling second novel in the Self series. If you loved all the twists and turns of the first one, then you’ll love this interesting sequel that picks up right where the reader last left off!

In the debut story, we got to meet Gerhard Self for the first time. He used to work in the judicial system and the courts, but everything changed. As a result of his life shift, he had to find a new line of work that he could do, and ended up becoming a detective.

This private detective took on a case from an old friend last time and is now back in another crime adventure. Even though this P.I. may have a dour outlook and sarcastic wit, even he may be surprised at what is coming his way this time.

He may have a realistic view of the world, but even he may be surprised at the level of covering up that is being done– and not just by anyone. With terrorism going on and turmoil going down, this private eye is about to find out that the government has its own set of secrets and is covering up something. What happens if the two were to come together? The result would be sure to be explosive.

Now someone has gone missing. She is the daughter of a Bonn bureaucrat who has tons of power. Now the father has hired Self to try and track down Leo Salger. He takes it and gets started with his investigation. At first, his sleuthing leads him all the way to a local hospital and the psych ward.

Once he gets there, Self starts to get suspicious. The staff is trying to make him believe that Leo died by falling from a window there. But the story is all too neat, and he doesn’t believe that it’s true. Gerhard thinks that the daughter is still out there.

He’s about to find out that he’s right. However, Leo was also wrapped up with terrorists. Now it’s trying to be hushed up by the government. Can he find the girl and foil some plots too? Pick up this book to find out!

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