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Clifford D. Simak Books In Order

Publication Order of Standalone Novels

Cosmic Engineers (1950) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Empire (1951) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Time and Again (1951) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Ring Around the Sun (1952) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Time is the Simplest Thing (1961) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Trouble with Tycho (1961) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
They Walked Like Men (1962) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Way Station (1963) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
All Flesh is Grass (1965) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Werewolf Principle (1967) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Why Call Them Back from Heaven? (1967) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Goblin Reservation (1968) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
So Bright the Vision (1968) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Out of Their Minds (1969) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Prehistoric Man (1971) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Destiny Doll (1972) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
A Choice of Gods (1972) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Cemetery World (1973) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Our Children's Children (1974) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Enchanted Pilgrimage (1975) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Shakespeare's Planet (1976) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
A Heritage of Stars (1977) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Mastodonia (1978) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Fellowship of the Talisman (1978) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Visitors (1980) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Project Pope (1981) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Special Deliverance (1982) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Where the Evil Dwells (1982) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Highway of Eternity (1986) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Collections

The Creator (1946) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
City (1952) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Strangers in the Universe (1956) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Worlds of Clifford Simak (1960) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Other Worlds of Clifford Simak (1962) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
All the Traps of Earth (1963) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Night of the Puudly (1964) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Worlds Without End (1964) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Best Science Fiction Stories of Clifford D. Simak (1967) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Trilogy of the Future (1972) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Skirmish (1977) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Marathon Photograph (1986) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Brothers (1987) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Off-Planet (1988) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Autumn Land (1990) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Immigrant (1991) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Over the River and Through the Woods (1996) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Civilisation Game (1997) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Hellhounds of the Cosmos and Other Tales from the Fourth Dimension (2011) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
I Am Crying All Inside and Other Stories (2015) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Big Front Yard and Other Stories (2015) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Ghost of a Model T and Other Stories (2015) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Grotto of the Dancing Deer and Other Stories (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
No Life of Their Own and Other Stories (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
New Folks' Home and Other Stories (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
A Death in the House and Other Stories (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Good Night, Mr. James and Other Stories (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Earth for Inspiration and Other Stories (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Shipshape Miracle and Other Stories (2017) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

About Clifford D. Simak

An American newspaperman for the majority of his life, Clifford D. Simak was also an extremely well regarded author as well. Mostly focusing on the fantasy and science-fiction genres, he was able to entertain and engage his many readers worldwide, something which he continues to do to this day. Knowing and understanding his audience, he was a well regarded author who managed to really get to the heart of what it was that his audience were actually looking for.

Early and Personal Life

It was in 1904 on the 3rd of August that Clifford D. Simak was born, as he would grow up in Millville, Wisconsin, in the United States. Born and raised in the area, he would come to have a keen love of literature and the written word, nurturing this passion throughout the years. This, in time, would evolve into his work with newspapers, as he would come to be involved heavily in the printing industry.

Over time he would become more heavily invested in this industry and the medium, as he would later branch off into writing for himself full-time. Attending the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he would later come to teach himself as well in various public schools, finishing in 1929. Friends with Isaac Asimov, he would become an integral part of the science-fiction writing community too, leaving a legacy behind that stands proud to this day.

Writing Career

From an early age, Simak held a fascination for science-fiction, becoming heavily interested in the works of author H.G. Wells. Later writing himself for the publication ‘Wonder Stories’, he would have his first contribution published titled ‘The World of the Red Sun’ in 1931. This would then pave the way to a lifetime spent writing various works and pieces that would come to shape much of the ‘Golden Age of Science-Fiction’ in its early years.

Regularly using themes and concepts that he would often repeat, many of his stories would feature aspects such as a rural setting in Wisconsin, along with protagonists who were rugged and individualistic in their nature. This would see him come to create his own style, one that would definitely stand out from the rest, setting him apart over the years to come. Living with his long time wife Agnes Kuchenberg and their two children Richard Scott and Shelley Ellen, he lived a long and illustrious life, creating many seminal works in the process.

Way Station

First released through the Collier Books publishing label, this was originally published in the month of November in 1963. A stand-alone title, it manages to evoke a number of different ideas and feelings with its entirely self-contained narrative. Published during the middle of Simak’s career too, it also gives an idea of his trajectory as a writer, as well as where he was going too.

A ponderous almost meditative piece, this calls up some of the deeper questions that humanity faces as it progresses at a rapid rate. Seen through the eyes of its leading protagonist Enoch Wallace, the reader has a way in to ask themselves these questions, considering many of the deeper implications. Using broad rural landscape, Simak essentially takes this as his canvas, drawing the reader in to his rich and evocative world. It also shows what can really be done with science-fiction as a genre in terms of message and scope, taking the reader on a journey beyond the stars.

Carrying the same gun that he’s carried ever since the Civil War, the ageless hermit Enoch Wallace spends his days striding across his own untended farm, something which he’s done for almost a century now. Unbeknownst to the world outside though, is that within his house that’s also remained unchanged he communes with a whole host of intergalactic friends. Recruited a hundred years prior by the alien Ulysses, he manages the Earth’s only galactic way station point, tending to the only galactic transfer point between humanity and the stars. Watching as Earth progresses exponentially, he must keep an eye upon the technological developments of humanity, as he comes to realize that the planet is heading on a doomed path. Is there anything that he can do to stop this? Can Ulysses offer any help to him and humanity? What will become of the way station?

Shakespeare’s Planet

Initially published using the Ballantine Books publishing imprint, this was first brought out in the year of 1976. Another stand-alone title, this isn’t a part of any series as such, allowing it to be read casually, with all its messages and ideas contained within. Released not long after the previous book, this is definitely a must for any fans of the author, or simply those looking to find out more.

A fun escapist novel, this really is one of Simak’s highly inventive titles, clearly displaying the sheer breadth and scope of his imagination as a writer. Creating iconic characters as well, he manages to draw the reader in, giving it a very grounded feel, despite it being set light years away. Using rich and evocative imagery too, Simak makes sure to give it all an extremely vivid and vibrant style throughout as well. However far he goes, he always keeps the action and the messages close to home, allowing the reader to really become invested in its narrative. It is his ideas that also continually shine through too, giving thought to the big questions facing humanity once again.

Accompanied by three fellow crew members, Carter Horton is assigned with travelling the stars in order to locate a planet fit for human habitation. Sent into a deep sleep until they arrive at their destination, they’re all placed in suspended animation, but the system’s malfunction leaving only Carter alive. Arriving solo at the destination it’s been two thousand years, and the ship itself is unable to return Carter back to humanity. On the planet though, he meets a single living being called Carnivore, who then proceeds to tell Carter that there is one way back through an inter-space tunnel. Will it get him to where he wants to go though? What will life be like once he does get back? Can he ever hope to survive Shakespeare’s Planet?

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