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David B. Coe Books In Order

Publication Order of Blood of the Southlands Books

The Sorcerers' Plague (2007)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Horsemen's Gambit (2008)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Dark-Eyes' War (2010)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Justis Fearsson Books

Spell Blind (2014)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
His Father's Eyes (2015)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Shadow's Blade (2016)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Knightfall Books

Knightfall - The Infinite Deep (2019)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Lon Tobyn Chronicle Books

Children of Amarid (1997)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Outlanders (1998)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Eagle-Sage (2000)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Winds of the Forelands Books

Rules of Ascension (2002)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Seeds of Betrayal (2003)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Shapers of Darkness (2005)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Bonds of Vengeance (2005)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Weavers of War (2007)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Standalone Novels

Weitchie (1990)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Robin Hood (2010)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

David B Coe is a science fiction, fantasy, and historical fiction author who writes both short stories and long-form novels. As a teen, he went to Brown University for his undergraduate studies, got his master’s degree and then a doctorate in history from Stanford. He is the co-founder and regular contributor to Magical Words, a blog that has several authors who discuss fantasy writing. He is also the author of a writers’ handbook on writing fantasy titled “How to Write Magical Words.” Writing under the pseudonym DB Jackson, he writes the epic/time travel fantasy series “The Islevale Cycle.” He is also the author of the “Thieftaker Chronicles” which combines aspects of historical, mystery, and urban fantasy and is set in a pre-Revolutionary Boston. As DB Coe, he is an award-winning novelist who has written the “LonTobyn Chronicles” that won the Crawford Award. He is also the author of several bestselling series that include “Winds of the Forelands” that is a critically acclaimed series, “Knightfall” that is inspired by “Knightfall” from the “History Channel,” the “Case Files of Justis Fearsson,” the “Blood of the Southlands” trilogy, and several single standing titles. Coe’s novels have been translated into more than twelve languages across the United States and the Americas.

David Coe always had the writing bug and as a six-year-old, he had written his first story that he called “Jim the Talking Fish.” While he had a good title, he has asserted that it was not very good even with the illustrations that he did himself. While his first effort was not that good, it marked the beginning of an obsession and fantasy for storytelling. David dreamed of one day making it big as an author and was always dreaming up stories and putting them in notebooks that he gave friends and family to read. While he always wanted to become a professional author, it was not to be in the early years. For several years after graduating from college, he dabbled in several professions. His longest stint was as a political consultant which was something he did for several years. Years earlier he also thought of pursuing a career in academia and even went ahead to earn a doctorate in American history. However, he thought better of it and never pursued that path. Coe’s first published work was “The Children of Amarid” that he first published in 1997. As an established author of historical fiction, he was approached to pen the novelization of the award-winning movie “Robin Hood” by Ridley Scott. He currently lives with Nancy Berner his wife and two children in the small town of Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee.

As for his origins and influences, David Coe has said that he developed a relationship with the written word very early in life. Growing up, his parents instilled in him and his sibling a profound love for books as all four of them are now authors even though they write in a variety of genres. While Coe grew up in New York City suburbs, he had a very well-developed sense of nature. As a seven-year-old, his older brothers would take him along when they went into the woods on bird-watching expeditions. In his mind, it was about going into briar patches and thickets to flush out curious feathered objects. While he never cared for his brothers’ motivation, the frequent ventures into the woods soon resulted in David developing a fascination with nature. When he wrote his doctorate, it was on a nature theme which is something that is all over the settings of his fantasy fiction novels. He has said that it was from these early influences that he wrote thrilling fantasy fiction such as the William Crawford Fantasy Award-winning “LonTobyn Chronicle” trilogy.

David B. Coe’s “Rules of Ascension” is set nearly a millennia after the end of the Qirsi War. The Forelands have been enjoying relative peace for several hundred years now and the citizens are hopeful it will last. The Qirsi leaders named the Weavers who had caused so much turmoil by binding nature and the thoughts of people as they wished had finally been killed. The ordinary members of the race had been scattered abroad and since they did not have their exceptional leaders, they were not an existential threat. While most of the Qirsi now live what would be considered normal lives with some of them even working as advisors to the new nobles, under the surface things are not so well. The Forelands have reported the reemergence of a Weaver who has been actively fomenting rebellion against the Eandi. The Eandi overlords do not have the magical powers of the Qirsi but are physically hardier. Lord Tavis of Curgh who is the son of a duke had been engaged to Lady Brienne of Kentigern and as things are, it would seem that he will one day become a great man in the realm. But then he is accused of doing some horrible thing and it looks like he has been used as a pawn by the Weavers who have a far-reaching conspiracy to topple the ruling Eandi. To get out of the sticky situation, he will need the help of a Qirsi gleaner. Only by clearing his name will he be able to stave off what is likely to be a devastating civil war in the realm.

“Seed of Betrayal” by David Coe opens to the Forelands in turmoil as the Qirsi who are powerful sorcerers have been fomenting civil strife for years. While many people will not acknowledge the conspiracy, several nobles and a handful of the Qirsi who deem themselves citizens of the realm decide to take action. They make that decision even though it could come at the cost of their honor, respect, and even their own lives. In the meantime, the tenuous threads that had been keeping the realm together begin to unravel even as the rebels are unaware of each other’s actions. When the king dies, the nobles come together to choose a new leader only for a dangerous new power to come from the unlikeliest of sources. Soon new alliances are forming as former enemies form unlikely partnerships. But like most new partnerships, pride, jealousy, and love have the power to build or destroy them. The future of the realm that has stood for nearly a millennium is now in danger as the nine-century old grudge is reignited. To prevent catastrophe, the citizens may have to depend on a few nobles and Qirsi and a reluctant hero and assassin.

“Bonds of Vengeance” continues with the story of the Forelands where the Qirsi people have hatched a conspiracy against the new rulers of the land – the Eandi. The accidental death of a nobleman had resulted in unprecedented violence that threatened to tear the fabric of the now fragile Forelands society. The Qirsi had the upper hand but a Qirsi Weaver has been using magical powers to turn the Qirsi against their kinsmen and weaken the alliances among the Eandi. Some Qirsi who had been serving the Eandi are now torn between staying loyal and overthrowing the hated Eandi. Some have been harboring rebellion in their hearts for years and do not hesitate to join the increasingly violent and burgeoning rebellion. Meanwhile, an Eandi nobleman is also in the conspiracy as he plots against his fellow noblemen that he deems rivals. For Grinsa the Qirsi gleaner, war is something he needs to avoid at all costs since it would spell not only trouble for the Eandi but his people too. He may be the only person that can stop the society from unraveling and undoing all the gains made in the last 900 years.

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