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Emily Nussbaum Books In Order

Publication Order of Essay Collections

I Like to Watch (2019) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Emily Nussbaum is an essayist and writer.

This culture critic is an avid writer that has seen a fair share of her work make it into print. She created an Approval Matrix that was featured in 2004 as part of New York magazine. She also had the honor of winning a Pulitzer Prize for her printed columns as well.

This artist is making further strides with the Random House debut, a collection of carefully curated essays. Debuted in 2019, this is a new collection from a writer that has long been someone to seek out.

A brilliant and challenging compilation of essays from a fan of pop culture and television in particular, some have been previously published and some are new. It is a totally original book from one of the freshest voices in modern print today, so check it out if you are interested by going online to see if it is available.

In this debut, straight away the reader is getting the best of this writer on a topic that she has a lot of passion about. If you have come across some of her work or are just interested in essay collections that are not going to put you to sleep, check out this debut.

These essays put forth that people become ultimately what we are watching. It’s an interesting premise, anyone would have to admit. These provocative set of thoughts are cataloged thoughtfully and explored from a writer that found a love of television that started way back in the day.

She admits that she has always known that some of who we are is rooted in what we are watching. There are also two essays that have never been published before that are being unveiled in this debut. The author is clear about the love affair and passion that she has for television. It all originally started when she found her way into watching a show known to many as ‘Buffy’.

The show was ostensibly about the main character, who has a talent handed down to her for fighting vampires. Blonde and ready for a fight, she was known as the chosen one, a slayer that comes once in a generation to fight the vampires and protect others. She also had a handy group of friends that assisted her in her various encounters with the supernatural of various forms and motivations.

In her opinion, this was a show that ended up becoming a lot more than what it originally appeared to be. Her obsession with the show peaked while she was studying literature in grad school. It opened her eyes to the fact that television shows could be a lot more than just one dimensional.

The love affair that followed with television was not just watching junk t.v. to fill up the time but ended up becoming an education as well as a debate. When it comes to television, just what exactly qualifies someone’s work as being great? Is someone’s art higher than someone else’s?

This is what led her to her interest in a critic and her reviews have been not just a commentary on what is airing on television that is worth watching but our shared culture as well. It has been the thing that motivated to trail blaze her career, tracing the female protagonist and her evolution over the years through all of her musings and essays.

She has been watching female main characters and how they have changed over the past decade as well as the role that sexual violence plays on television and more thoughts! The author also looks at potential links been the antiheroes and other intriguing points.

This book is an interesting collection of this critic’s thoughts and imaginings, and each piece allows her to share her search over the past fifteen years or so for a type of criticism. She’s been looking for a new variety of criticism that is able to resist a deceptive hierarchy that places one culture form at a more elevated place than the other.

As a fan of television ever since that initial exposure to Buffy, Emily traces along her struggle to try and get through the oppressive notion that the concept of prestige television brings along with it. She is attempting to try and find a free and wild idea that is more varied in the end in its expression of artistic ambition. If this is one that acknowledges a variety of complexity and beauty along the way, so much the better. That is one that might open up to different voices that each have their own place.

This book is as much a loving tribute to a medium of art and entertainment as it is to the people that help create some truly great shows to watch. Whether you are a huge television watcher or hardly ever touch the remote (maybe you don’t even own a set of your own), there’s something for everyone to find interesting in a debut from a critic that thinks there’s a place for this art form in our hearts.

Emily takes a sharp look at culture, television, taste, and many things in general through the pages of this phenomenally engaging first book. Television is finally praised for what it is, without shame or through the lens of pretending that it’s not something that the author and others are really into– and sometimes it is even really good! A lot of the time, actually, if you choose the right shows that speak to you.

We all have some things in common and one of those things is sitting down and hanging out solo or with some people and watching our favorite shows or finding new ones to watch too! A lot of people living in the world out there have a television set and even cable set ups.

With so much to watch, so much being done with shows in terms of different channels and mediums and streaming services, there is certainly a lot to celebrate. Television changes and has changed quite a bit over the years. It will probably will change some more. Check out this awesome love letter to t.v. from a big fan that knows all about it!

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