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Grant McKenzie Books In Order

Publication Order of Ian Quinn Books

The Fear In Her Eyes (2014)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Butcher's Son (2016)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Standalone Novels

Switch (2008)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
No Cry for Help (2010)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
K.A.R.M.A. (2011)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Port of Sorrow (2013)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Speak The Dead (2015)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Short Stories/Novellas

Avalanche on the Prairie (2000)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Underbelly (2013)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Nasty Evil Bitch Boss (2013)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Groza (2013)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Grant McKenzie is a Scottish born Canadian mystery thriller author best known for edge of your seat thrillers. His first novel was “Switch” a novel that launched his career as it was published in Germany, the UK, Canada, the US, China, and Taiwan among many other countries. His other novels include “Port of Sorrow,” “The Butcher’s Apron,” “K.A.R.M.A.,” “The Fear in Her Eyes,” “No Cry for Help,” and “Speak the Dead.” McKenzie also writes the “Dixie Flynn” series of novels under the pseudonym M.C. Grant. The Midnight Ink published series debuted with “Angel with a Bullet.” He would later follow that up with “Devil With A Gun” and then “Beauty With A Bomb” that was Shamus Award finalist. He has also been involved in short fiction writing and “Underbelly” was featured in the Lee Child edited “International Thriller Writers First Thrills.” McKenzie has also worked as a journalist in several areas of the newspaper business. He has worked as Editor in Chief of Monday Magazine, design/copy editor of broadsheets in Canada and late-night reporter for “Dead Body Beat.” He currently lives in Victoria British Columbia and often volunteers with the poor and the homeless.

Grant McKenzie grew up in Scotland during the 1960s at a time when alcoholism, unemployment, and violence was the order of the day with orange hair the norm. His dull brunette head stood out among all the bland and blond masses and this made him a target from a very young age. Since he did not have the gift of the gab and could not become a badass, he decided to become the boy with lightning-fast quips and storytelling prowess. He became a popular student that made many friends who watched his back when he got into trouble for being different. Nonetheless, he never forgot how vulnerable he still was and channeled that vulnerability towards writing. His writing allowed him to explore the dark alleyways without losing the fear that makes his novels so relatable and identifiable. This is the reason most of his characters are ordinary citizens such as child protection officers, bus drivers, photojournalists and failed actors rather than you typical superstar Jack Reacher hero.

McKenzie started writing from a very early age when he wrote short stories and plays growing up in Scotland. As a teenager writing his first novel, he cites S.E. Hinton as one of his biggest influences. Aged only nineteen he got his first job working at a daily tabloid. He was in charge of the “Dead Body Beat” an assignment that meant he had to monitor police communications for any interesting leads on dead bodies that occurred during the night. It was a unique job that often had him wondering what if and fed his fertile imagination. As a journalist, his job was to go the scene, observe and then write. This tended to be frustrating as he wanted to know more. As an author, he could go beyond observing as he could seek justice for victims and dig deeper into the motivations of the killers. An example of his frustration is evident in the novel Kids Against Rape Murder Abuse which he abbreviated as “K.A.R.M.A.” McKenzie has asserted that his work as a journalist has given him the ability to never stop learning, always be curious and never to be afraid of asking questions no matter how difficult they may be. He knows all about the effectiveness of having a list of contacts to call. For instance, a simple call to the right person could get one information about the workings of the morgue from the coroner or a veteran could tell one all they need to know about what it means to be a sniper.

Grant McKenzie’s “The Ian Quinn Series” is about a man named Quinn that runs a private child protection agency. He has had a terrible childhood as his father had abandoned them after going to the store to get groceries only for his elder sister to also disappear soon after, leaving him destitute. He lived above his grandfather’s butcher shop and was apprenticed to the trade even as his mother lost herself in drink. Three decades later, he is the owner of a run-down butcher shop after the death of his father. But Quinn also has to deal with scary men who are associated with the life that his father had led. These men are now coming after him. Ian Quinn comes to realize just how many secrets his grandfather and father had kept from him. He has to quickly shed his innocence even as he second-guesses everything he had ever been told growing up. Nonetheless, he is a very tough social worker and while his frequent run-ins with criminals leave him bruised and battered, he always soldiers on. He often gets help from a sexy lawyer and a friendly police officer with the connections he needs.

McKenzie’s “The Fear In Her Eyes” opens to Ian reading an anonymous death threat delivered to him via letter. It is not something unusual given that he has received many such letters as a court-mandated child protection officer. He is often the easiest target for the frustrated parents of children that the court has made rulings against, from his recommendations. But his day is just about to get worse as a dirty vagrant stuffs an envelope with a cryptic message into his hand. The note has a short cryptic message that sends shivers down his spine. It says “He says he’s sorry.” The envelope is clearly meant for him as it has its name on the front and a visitor’s pass to the State Penitentiary which he finds quite odd. The only man he knows at the Oregon State Penitentiary had once upon a time turned his life upside down and now that he is back, he is filled with revulsion and terror. The man in question had killed his only daughter in a drunk driving incident and now wants to see him, asserting that he was paid to do it.

In “The Butcher’s Son,” Ian Quinn is still dealing with the death of his daughter who had died in front of his own eyes crossing the road to meet him after school. He blames himself for the incident and so he decided to become a child protection officer. Quinn thinks his job can help him protect children and in doing so salve his conscience over failing to protect his child. But then he gets the news informing him that he has just come into an inheritance of a butcher shop from his father Augustus. But with the gift come a clot of complications that are related to the disappearance of his sister years ago. He also comes into the knowledge of a lot of secrets in his family though he also learns of the good work done by his grandfather. But first, he needs to fend off Walter Zilig who was an associate of his father and is now back with a sinister agenda.

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