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Jack D. Hunter Books In Order

Publication Order of Blue Max Books

The Blue Max (1966) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Blood Order (1979) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Tin Cravat (1981) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Standalone Novels

The Expendable Spy (1965) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
One of Us Works for Them (1968) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Spies, Inc. (1970) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Terror Alliance (1980) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Florida is Closed Today (1982) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Judgement in Blood (1986) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Flying Cross (1987) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Tailspin (1990) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Potsdam Bluff (1991) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Sweeney's Run (1992) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Slingshot (1995) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Cure (2003) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Ace (2008) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Books Written as Lee Thompson

Addie (2005) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Dampness of Mourning (2011) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Gossamer (2013) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
A Beautiful Madness (2014) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Earthly Things (2014) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
It's Only Death (2015) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Devil Gave Them Black Wings (2015) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Lesser People (2015) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Shine Your Light On Me (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
After the Fog Clears (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
An Ounce of Mercy (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Jack D. Hunter was an American author that was best known for his war stories. Jack died in 2009. The ‘D’ in Jack’s name stands for ‘Dayton.

+Biography

Jack lived a strange and somewhat unexpected life. Born in 1921 in Hamilton, Ohio to Whitney G and Irene Dayton Hunter, Jack’s life seemed to end even as it was just starting when the doctors declared him stillborn.

However, the author wasn’t quite so willing to fade away without a fight. Considering the fact his father worked in the paint color evaluation arena, it came as a bit of a surprise for Jack to learn that he was red-green blind.

Not that the discovery made much difference to Jack D. Hunter. Jack never had much use for education. He mostly ignored his classes and found that schoolbooks had nothing to offer him.

If you had asked him why he so thoroughly detested education, he would have told you that he thought education was boring on a whole and that going to class and doing one’s homework achieved little more than allowing one to eventually graduate. It wasn’t the sort of goal Jack D. Hunter cared to achieve.

Interestingly enough, Jack somehow managed to make it to college. Though, the author’s approach to life was no different in college than it had been during his high school days. Jack spent a disturbing amount of time simply lounging about.

That might not make much sense considering just how much work the author had to put in to meet the financial rigors of going to college. Job opportunities were a little scarce at the time. So the author taught himself how to play the piano, and by playing in an orchestra Jack was able to finance his education. Some of the author’s more notable achievements in college include being commended for managing the school’s track team.

Following his graduation from Penn State University with a degree in journalism in 1943, Jack D. Hunter went into the army. The decision probably shocked everyone who knew him, especially when one takes into account the author’s hate for regimentation.

However, the attack on Pearl Harbor seemed to change everything. Jack wasn’t a fan of violence which is why he seemed to thrive as a member of a counterintelligence team. The author’s achievements during the war were notable and he won a lot of recognition for his efforts, not to mention being decorated.

When the war ended, Jack D. Hunter dabbled in journalism. Because he spoke German, the author was sent to Germany once the war finally ended. It should be emphasized that Jack wasn’t necessarily a reporter. Rather, he performed various roles in the field of journalism, this including working as a speech writer and a public relations executive.

When Jack finally wrote ‘The Blue Max’, his first book was met with rejection. Interestingly enough, the firms Jack approached claimed that the book was unpublishable. Clearly, they were wrong because the book went on to sell a million copies.

‘The Blue Max’ was even turned into a British War Movie in 1996. Featuring James Mason, George Peppard and Ursula Andress, and directed by John Guillermin, ‘The Blue Max’ chronicled the exploits of a German Pilot on the Western Front during the First World War.

It could be argued that Jack D. Hunter had been bursting with creative energy since he was a child. Back then, the author had a thing for sketching and painting, and he had a special interest in producing art related to trains and boats. The fact that Jack was color blind didn’t even slow him down.

Jack D. Hunter always wrote about the War. He had a special interest in the World Wars. The author endeavored to explore his stories from different perspectives, revealing the horrors of combat on the battlefield and the impact such conflict could have on ordinary civilians.

Jack’s final book was ‘The Ace’. It was published in 2008. In 2009, Jack died. By this time, the author had reignited his love for music and painting. He also had a website whose blog he made an effort to maintain.

Jack D. Hunter’s biggest achievement in life is the fact that he got to write what he wanted, when wanted, how he wanted.

The author’s most notable accolade was being an Edgar Award Finalist for the ‘Best’ Novel’ Category in 1965.

+ The Blue Max

Bruno Stachel is meant for the mountaintop. The young soldier is sure of that much, and the fact that he is just another new recruit doesn’t dissuade him from pursuing his dreams. As a member of a German Combat Squadron in the First World War, Bruno believes that there is no other German decoration more important than the Blue Max, and there is nothing he won’t do to get it.

That includes shooting down as many planes as he can find and sleeping with his commander’s wife, not to mention eliciting the love and attention of the public. Jack D. Hunter attempts to provide a glimpse into the mind of this strong-willed pilot and the ambition that just might destroy him.

The first book from Jack D. Hunter centers on Bruno Stachel. After leaving the infantry and joining the German Air Service, Bruno is a little uncomfortable, mostly because he is the new guy. Bruno wants nothing more than to become a hero.

However, getting the coveted Blue Max Prize won’t be easy. Bruno has to shoot a hell of a lot of enemy aircraft down during combat. In his determination to prove himself, Bruno deals with many successes and failures.

2). The Blood Oder

In ‘The Blue Max’, Bruno Stachel won German’s highest honor by performing some truly daring feats. However, life as a hero isn’t all it is cracked up to be. Bruno’s marriage to a German publisher is terrible, and Bruno isn’t making things better by bedding the mother of his closest friend.

A struggling alcoholic, Bruno eventually grows so miserable that he finally decides to quit drinking. This allows Bruno some perspective as he struggles to find his new calling in life.

On the one hand, Bruno could take the route of espionage. On the other hand, Bruno hates politics and subterfuge. However, there aren’t that many opportunities offering Bruno another chance at excitement and adventure.

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