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James D. Shipman Books In Order

Publication Order of Standalone Novels

Constantinopolis (2013)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Going Home (2014)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
It is Well (2016)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
A Bitter Rain (2017)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Task Force Baum (2019)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Irena's War (2020)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

James D Shipman
James D Shipman is a historical author born and bred in the Pacific Northwest. Shipman began poems and short stories while doing his history degree. He later completed a law degree at Gonzaga University before opening his law firm. Shipman is still a practicing attorney, and he is able to balance this with his writing. Since he is an avid reader, especially on historical matters, writing for Shipman comes easy. The talented author also enjoys traveling with his family and spending some quality time with them.

It Is Well
It Is Well tells the story of the Beecher family and their experiences during World War II. Jonathan runs his small-town store and enjoys being a loving father to his two sons and one daughter. While he has been content with whatever life throws at him, Jonathan things that the world is starting to ask for too much. First, Jonathan losses his wife to cancer. He promises to stay faithful to her even in death and remains dedicated to raising their children. However, Jonathan’s sons Luke and Mathew, and his daughter Mary seem determined to disappoint their father. All Jonathan wants is the best for them, but it seems that his guidance is not welcome in his children’s lives.

Mathew doesn’t want to turn into his father, which explains why he decides to work away from home despite his father’s urging. Luke, always the wild one, decides to join the army even when his father begs him to reconsider this decision. Mary, the devoted and bright daughter that Jonathan wants so badly to go to college, decides to elope with an abusive man instead. Given all that is going in his children’s lives, it is easy to understand his despair and disappointment. The war only makes things worse. Jonathan stares at an uncertain future, and the people he hoped would give him strength are nowhere to be seen.

This story comes with historically accurate information about World War II. Through the Beecher’s, we get to see what effect this trying time had on families. However, it is not all grim as a ray of light emerges just when Jonathan is about to give up. Sarah, a widow, turns into a compelling friend, and Jonathan finds it hard to keep the promise he made to his wife. This book explores the absurdity of human suffering. From the characters, it is easy to see that spiritual gain comes with irrevocable loss. The author had done a good job of developing flawed characters that are easy to identify with. As you follow their struggles during the war, it is easy to understand their choices and wish them well in all that they undertake.

It Is Well is a well-written historical story that focuses on one family. As the Americans and the Japanese continue fighting, families struggle with personal issues and the uncertainty that comes with the war. Jonathan is a man of faith, but he suffers as well, and the author lets us see his fragility. However, in the midst of all this darkness, love still finds a way to bring comfort to those who are heartbroken. If you are looking for an interesting historical story with a family at its core, this book is perfect. You will find the language alluring and the various themes well explored. The ending is bittersweet, but it is satisfying nonetheless.

Going Home
Going Home is more than a civil story. While the main events happen during the war, the author takes the reader on an emotional journey through the life of a man who experienced the worst betrayal by family and friends. Joseph Forsyth lives with his parents, who dream of relocating to America in search of greener pastures. When an opportunity arises, Joseph is all too happy to explore new horizons, and his mother encourages him to dream even bigger. However, things do not go as planned, and Joseph gets to Ireland only to be betrayed by his father.

The young boy, now separated from his family, grows in a cruel world that often takes advantage of his kind nature. Lucy, an alluring woman that Joseph likes, is among the people who Exploit his kindness with zero regard to his feelings. During the siege of Petersburg, Joseph is caught in the crossfire, which leaves him with serious injuries. As he lay unconscious in an army hospital, a widowed nurse named Rebecca Walker doesn’t leave his side. Joseph fights hard for his wife, and unknown to him, Rebecca is fighting her own internal battles as well. Soon enough, these two will have to make a choice to either hang on the past or heal their wounds and work to make sense of an uncertain future.

It is heartbreaking seeing the many failures and losses. Joseph encounters along the way. The author has painted the themes of family crisis and childhood trauma well, and it is easy to feel sorry for the protagonist, and all he goes through. However, Joseph does rise from it all, and it is beautiful how his life turns when he starts thinking of himself. This is one of those stories that will move you to tears. The feelings of betrayal and abandonment can be felt through the pages. Joseph goes through a lot as a boy and a man, so it is easy to rejoice with him once his life takes a turn for the better. The rest of the cast is just as captivating, and the Civil War conflicts make them even more interesting.

Going Home is a beautifully told story of a man who put everyone else’s needs before his own only for the world to keep on disappointing him. The author meticulously develops the plot, and his beautiful storytelling will leave you at the edge of your seat. Everything flows well, and, amazingly, this sad story ends on a happy note. Curious to see how Joseph’s life ends? Get this book for this and more. If you a historical fiction fan, there is no doubt that you will love this book.

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