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Lewis Carroll Books In Order

Publication Order of Alice In Wonderland Books

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There (1871) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Wasp in a Wig (1877) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Nursery Alice (1889) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Alice's Adventures Under Ground (1965) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Sylvie and Bruno Books

Sylvie and Bruno (1889) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Sylvie and Bruno Concluded (1893) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Standalone Novels

Bruno's Revenge (1867) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Hunting of the Snark (1876) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
A Tangled Tale (1885) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Short Story Collections

Phantasmagoria and Other Poems (1869) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Three Sunsets and Other Poems (1898) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
For the Train: Five Poems and a Tale (1932) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Rectory Umbrella and Mischmasch (1932) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Publication Order of Non-Fiction Books

Euclid and His Modern Rivals (1879) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Lewis Carroll's Diaries (1994) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Lewis Carroll was the pen name used by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson born 1832 died in 1898. He was a mathematician, English writer, Anglican deacon, logician, and a photographer. His prolific writings include Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking Glass. He is also known for his facility at logic, word play, and fantasy.

Carroll family was mainly northern English but had Irish connections. Most of his male ancestors were either Church of England clergy or army officers. His great grandfather has risen through the ranks of the church and later became the Bishop of Elphin. His grandfather served as an army captain but was killed in the line of duty in Ireland in 1803.

Carroll attended Westminster School and later joined Christ Church in Oxford. He resolved to follow other family tradition and vowed to take the holy orders. He was mathematically gifted and was the winner of a double first degree which could have resulted in an excellent academic career. In 1830, Carroll married Frances Jane Lutwidge and later became a parson.

Carroll was born in Cheshire near the towns of Runcorn and Warrington. He was the eldest son but the third child of a four and half year old marriage. When Carroll was 11 years of age, his dad was given the living of Croft-on-Tees in Northern Yorkshire, and the entire family relocated to the large rectory. This became their home for the next two and half decades. His father was conservative but an active cleric of Church of England who was later promoted as the Archdeacon of Richmond and sometimes was actively involved in the disputes that were the core of the division of the church.

During his early youth, Carroll received his education at home. At the age of seven, he actively read books such as The Pilgrim’s Progress. He was a stammer a condition that was shared by most of his siblings, and this mostly influenced his social life throughout his years. When he was aged 12, he went to Richmond Grammar School. In 1846, Carroll joined Rugby School, but this made him unhappy as illustrated by his writings a few years after leaving the school.

He left Rugby, and in May 1850 he joined Oxford as a member of his dad’s old college, Christ Church. Unfortunately, he only had been Oxford for only two days before he was summoned back home after his mother died at the age of 47.

His early academic career life was torn in between irresistible distraction and high promise. He was exceptionally gifted and did not always have to work hard for him to achieve anything. He obtained first class honors in Mathematics in 1852 and later was nominated to Studentship by Edward Pusey, his father’s old friend.

Later in 185, he was awarded a first class honors degree in the Final Honors School of Mathematics. His mathematician ingenuity won Carroll the Christ Church……Lectureship which he continued to maintain for the next two and half decades.

From a young age, Carroll wrote short stories and poetry and contributed mostly to Mischmasch, a family magazine. From 1854-1856 his work was featured in national publications such as The Train and The Comic Times as well as minor magazines such as Oxford Critic and Whitby Gazette. In 1856, Carroll released a piece of work using a pseudonym that would make him famous. He published a romantic poem titled Solitude using Lewis Carroll as the pen name.

Carroll first book was Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland published in 1865. It was the first novel in Alice in Wonderland series that consists of five books. Other standalone stories that Carroll wrote include Bruno’s Revenge (1867), The Hunting of the Snark (1876), and A Tangled Tale (1885).

In 1856, Carroll took up a new art form of photography which was profoundly influenced by his uncle Skeffington Lutwidge and later by Reginald Southey. By the time he ceased photography, he had already established his studio at Tom Quad and created approximately 3000 images. He stopped taking photographs simply because it was time-consuming for him.

To facilitate letter writing, Carroll invented what came to be known as The Wonderland…….Stamp Case in the year 1889. This invention was a cloth made folder that had 12 slots. The folder was then kept in a slipcase and decorated with a photo of Alice on the front, and on the back side, it was decorated with a picture of Cheshire cat.

Alice’s Adventure in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass

Tired of her story book lacking pictures or conversations, the young courageous and imaginative Alice follows a speedy hare underground- and comes face to face with some of the strangest and weirdest adventures and most interesting characters in all of the literature.

The Mad Hatter, the Ugly Duchess, the weeping Mock Turtle, the Cheshire Cat, the Queen of Hearts and much more. In scripting, this brilliant children’s book, the author has presented a funny satire of a staunch Victorian society, an arresting parody of the complexities, fears and the anxieties of growing up.

Carroll is an interesting and a prolific writer of all times, he is one of the few writers to enter the children world and created a world of make to believe, where the unreal becomes real, the impossible is possible and where the depths of imagination only limit the depths of adventures.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Alice chases after a Rabbit, and all of a sudden falls into Wonderland. Once she sets foot in Wonderland, she encounters a small door, and through this door, she can see an attractive garden that she sincerely wants to explore. However, since the door is too small for her, Alice comes across a table with an unknown drink, but after examining it, she realizes that it causes her to shrink and from there it becomes a comedy of some errors as Alice shrinks but is still unable to access the small beautiful garden.

The writing of this book is funny, entertaining and the flow of the story is impressive as well. The ending as well is great. If you are looking for interesting to read and also educational reads for your child, then it is recommended that you grab a copy of Lewis Carroll’s Alice Adventures books.

Book Series In Order » Authors » Lewis Carroll