BookSeriesInorder.com







Medieval Song Books In Order

Publication Order of Medieval Song Books

Warrior's Song (1984) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Fire Song (1985) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Earth Song (1990) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Secret Song (1991) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
Rosehaven (1996) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Penwyth Curse (2003) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Valcourt Heiress (2010) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Medieval song is a series of novels from Catherine Coulter that were first released in the 1980s.

+The Story

Catherine Coulter has a fascination with the Regency era and the Medieval Song books fall perfectly within that arena. The novels have been described as historical romances, though they are hardly typical.

Set in 13th century England, the Medieval Song series follows men and women who struggle to find love in crass and violent times. The books are famous for having very unlikable characters.

The heroines are either too whiny or too stubborn for their own good. The Heroes are terrible in more ways than one, perfectly happy to abuse, and rape and even commit violent acts against the heroines of their stories.

Some people think that Coulter goes so far with her books that the characters she creates are almost irredeemable. There is very little to like about her heroes and heroines.

And, to an extent, that adds to the attraction of the Medieval Song series because, besides the aspect of watching two people fall for one another, readers are also gifted the opportunity of seeing them make drastic changes, though this doesn’t always happen.

More often than not, the women in Coulter’s work are forced into relationships with the men against their own will. So the romance that eventually buds between them doesn’t always appeal to some people.

For some people, Coulter’s audacity to make her heroines sympathize with the heroes who victimized them in one sense or another is unacceptable. However, Coulter has a following of fans that seem to understand her unique sensibilities.

And they will defend her by pointing out that her historical romances are as accurate as one can get. The heroes and heroines of the Medieval Song series might be terrible people, but that particular era was known for its crude and crass nature.

Morality wasn’t nearly as black and white back then, and it was acceptable for men to treat their women in ways that were not particularly gentle. And in showing that aspect of love and revealing the fact that romance that blossom even in the grimy and coarse environment of the Victorian Era, Catherine Coulter sets her books apart from every other romance novel on the market.

+The Author

Catherine Coulter comes from an artistic background. Born in 1942 in Texas, the American Author had a pianist for a mother and a singer for a father, not to mention her grandmother who was a writer.

At the University of Texas, Coulter not only took interest in the literary aspects of her school but she also gravitated towards European History. By the time she acquired her Master’s degree in European History, Coulter had garnered more than enough knowledge about the previous centuries of Europe to boldly create her own stories.

Ever since she began writing in 1978, Coulter has produced numerous historical romances set in Victorian England. Though, it is her suspense thrillers that have brought her true success, especially the FBI series.

Catherine Coulter’s approach to writing historical romance is unique and far different from many of her counterparts. She is willing to take her characters to very dark places. The fact that her heroes and heroines are so unlikable hasn’t stopped the Medieval Song series from garnering interest.

+Warrior’s Song

Everyone calls Chandra the golden princess. However, the only thing Chandra cares about is fighting. The princess spends more time wearing armor than most princesses spend wearing their fancy gowns.

Chandra is happy with her life. She values her strength and independence, and she has little use for a husband. As such, she is a little displeased when her father chooses a man for her to marry.

Unlike Chandra, Jerval de Vernon wants the union to proceed because he wants Chandra. However, even after he saves her from a difficult situation, Chandra is not so willing to give her heart to him.

Jerval is determined to keep wooing Chandra until she gives in. However, he doesn’t realize just how stubborn Chandra can be.

This book has been rewritten and revised since its initial publication in the 1980s.

The focus of the novel is Chandra, a warrior who cares little for her duties as a princess or even as a woman. She would rather spend her days fighting with the rest of the men, and marriage couldn’t be farther from her mind. When her father finds a man for her to marry, Chandra gives Jerval as rough a time as possible.

And most readers will tell you that Chandra gets a little annoying as the book progresses, proving on more than one action that she might be more trouble than she is worth. Jerval seems certain throughout the story that he can change Chandra.

He is unwilling to abide the fact that she keeps competing with him for everything. Fans of Catherine Coulter will appreciate the way things wrap up. Audiences who don’t like the author won’t find much to enjoy in this book.

+Fire Song

Lord Graelam de Moreton and Kassia are set to marry. And Lord Graelam is more than ready to accept his new bride. However, Kassia isn’t nearly as innocent as she seems.

The second novel in the Medieval Song series is bound to frustrate a few people. A lot of people do a lot of bad things, the hero in particular. Lord Graelam seems nice at first, but then he goes off and does a few terrible things to his wife.

It is worth noting that the character first made his appearance in the first Medieval Song series novel, and he was responsible for the rape scene that turned so many people off. Those same people were probably surprised to find that he was acting so gentle in this book, at least with regards to caring for his delicate wife.

Of course, once he begins to believe that she betrayed him, he becomes vile. The pairing is bound to frustrate a lot of people. While the hero is rough and tends to take whatever he wants, the heroine is delicate and spends a considerable portion of the book in tears.

But this is what attracts people to Coulter’s books. Her pairings are rarely conventional.

Book Series In Order » Characters » Medieval Song