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Roxana Jullapat Books In Order

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Publication Order of Cookbooks

Mother Grains: Recipes for the Grain Revolution (2021)Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Roxana Jullapat
Pastry chef and baker Roxana Jullapat is a Los Angeles native of Thai and Costa Rican descent. She spent much of her childhood and early adulthood in Costa Rica, where she learned how to write and bake. She started pursuing a degree in journalism but turned to cooking.

As she was taking a break after graduating from college, she found herself baking a tarte tatin in the kitchen of Cafe Figaro in the bustling neighborhood of Los Feliz. From there, her fate was sealed. Over the next ten years, she held tenures at nationally acclaimed restaurants like AOC, Clarklewis, Companile, Lucques, and Bastide. She has also worked with renowned chefs like Suzanne Goin and Nancy Silverton.

In fall 2011, she teamed up with Daniel Mattern to open Cooks County, which they ran for four years.

After leaving Cooks County, they took a break for two years. They were able to travel, hang out with their friends, do a ton of home cooking. It was during this time that she began slowly incorporating grains into everything that she did, from any special cake she would bake for catering events to the pancakes she would make over the weekend.

One of the places they traveled was to go back to Costa Rica, the place that she had grown up. Then she went on to Turkey and went to Bhutan. Eventually, she wound up in Scandinavia. However, what was truly enriching to her was to not actually look at grains as something that needed to be rescued or a thing that was necessarily new, but something which is already a part of us and the fabric of who we are. People just need to reconnect with it.

By that point, Roxana knew that she wanted to open up a bakery, and they had the space and were under construction. It became, for her, a mission to take all of her tried-and-true recipes and see where they take on a new grainy personality. It was incredibly fun for her and showed her just how much potential different grains actually had, and it wasn’t too hard to find something to be gained just by using these certain ingredients in every application.

Then in May of 2017, she opened Friends & Family bakery, where she’s fully manifested her appreciation for Calfornia’s seasonality and ancient grains in her pastries and breads.

Roxana advocates for garden based education, and volunteers at school gardens all over town.

Her daily baking ritual is to show up at three in the morning and turn the lights on, turn the alarm off, turn the ovens on, and get the coffee going. The bread oven is turned on at all times, but she just increases the temp. she pulls the croissant carts from walk-in and begin washing eggs. By 3:30, the rest of the staff has come in and they help Roxana finish up the croissants.

If she’s working the bread station (something she does twice a week), feed the starter, begin the baguette dough and fire the deck oven with the breads that were pre-shaped the previous day. Then she goes through the motions of finishing up the baguette dough, make some rich dough for rolls, make some focaccia/pizza dough and then refire the deck with another round of bread. Then poach and bake the bagels and begin packing bread for their wholesale accounts.

Their second bread baker arrives at 5:30 am and begins autolyzing of all sourdoughs. By the time the bread heads out, it’s 6:30 in the morning, and Roxana takes a bit to regroup, get another cup of coffee and begin mixing for the next day.

Her biggest strength as a baker is that she still likes and loves it and is always amped about it. She is organized and works harder than anybody there. She likes to research and bring some new things to the repertoire. Roxana fosters a workplace that is casual yet also highly committed. However she does push them and push them hard. People that want to be a total geek and give it their all, they do well in her bakery, and as an owner, she tries finding these people.

“Mother Grains: Recipes for the Grain Revolution” is a cookbook that was released in the year 2021. As the owner and head baker of one beloved Los Angeles bakery, Roxana Jullapat knows the difference sustainable, local flour can make. Rustic rye, for example, adds unexpected chewiness to a bagel, brown rice flour lightens up a cake, and ground toasted oats enrich doughnuts. Friends & Family, her bakery, works with dedicated millers and farmers from around the country to source and incorporate the eight mother grains in every bread, sweet, or salad that is on the menu.

Roxana, in her debut cookbook, shares some of her greatest hits, more than ninety recipes for reinventing your favorite cookies, cakes, breads, pies, and more.

Roxana’s chocolate chip recipe can be made with any of the eight mother grains, with each flour yielding its own distinct chew, snap, or crunch. Her mouthwatering buckwheat pancake can reinvent itself with grainier cornmeal. One-bowl recipes such as Spelt Blueberry Muffins and Barley Pumpkin Bread are going to yield immediate rewards, as her Halvah Croissants and Cardamom Buns are laid out expertly to ensure you get the most out of each purchase.

She even includes some savory whole grain salads which are made with sorghum. Freekeh or Kamt, or easier warm dishes like Toasted Barley Soup, Farro alla Pilota, or Gallo Pinto, which pays homage to her Costa Rica upbringing. The sunny step-by-step pictures, storage tips, a sourcing guide, and notes on each of the grain’s histories round this comprehensive cookbook out.

This book, which is perfect for pastry pros or beginner bakers alike, it proves that whole grains are the secret to making any recipe so much more than just the sum of its parts.

The recipes are well arranged and inspiring, and the extra indices for gluten-free and vegan recipes. The pictures are very useful and the directions are encouraging and simple.

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