Everet Martins Books In Order

Publication Order of Age of Dawn Books

Stormcaller: The Age of Dawn (2014) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Lord of Death (2015) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Silver Tower (2015) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
The Shadow Realm (2015) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle
A New Light (2016) Hardcover  Paperback  Kindle

Everet Martins grew up in New Hampshire, and draws from all his exciting experiences for his novels. He loves taking part in role playing games and reading novels. In his childhood years, he was always being found with his nose in a book. He loved reading, and this love pushed him to first write some short stories, and later, a novel. As a kid, he loved martial arts and still does them today, and does various styles. He also does other things to keep himself in shape such as long distance running and strength training. Besides writing and martial arts, Martins also holds down a job in IT. He writes a lot, and reads a lot.

Everet writes “The Age of Dawn” series, a series that is dark fantasy. The series follows Walter, a normal average farming kid. He also writes essays that range on a number of different topics; some include a guide on how not to be lazy, why you should meditate, and how to read more books. In his essays, Everet Martins talks about many things that communicate ways in which people can get the most out of their time doing things. All of his essays can be found on his website; a place that you can also find descriptions for his next book and even ask the author questions.

“Stormcaller” is the first book in the “The Age of Dawn” series by Everet Martins. This book takes readers to Zoria, filled with carnivorous plants and volcanoes. Ten thousand years after Asebor was sealed after the first Age of Dawn, the power of the God has diminished enough so that war can happen once again. The Phoenix and Dragon gods are worshiped. A fortunate few are able to touch the essences and are able to transform average everyday women into great, deadly warriors and men into healers capable of miracles. The start of the next fight is taken to the town of Breden where Walter (son of elixir bean farmers) yearns for adventure. When he engages in battle, only then does he realize the truth of fighting with other people.

Fans of the book liked the way the author writes so that you keep wanting to turn the page. Fans liked the characters in the book and the fact that they could visualize the towns in the book. There are many characters in the book (not just limited to the main character, like in some novels) that are well drawn and fully developed, not just cardboard cutouts out of real people. The author does a lot to make this novel feel, that even though there are fantasy elements that the book still has real people in it (giving the book some verisimilitude). The novel contains a great blend of suspense, adventure, action, and magic. Holds the readers attention with the way it describes the battle scenes, and the landscapes of Zoria. The author handles character development without sacrificing anything else important to the guts of the overall story. Some readers felt that the book grabbed them from the very beginning and would not allow them to put the book down until they were done with it. Fans of the book could not wait to read more from Everet.

Some of the readers felt the characters were underdeveloped and there was not quite enough meat to the story. Some readers also felt that the series was geared to people who enjoyed books with more gore and cursing, which they did not like. Readers felt that the book featured certain characters who appeared to be untouched by the deaths of their friends and family, and that people died all over the place; it had no plot, full of filler scenes. Some felt that the book just uses too many archetype characters and not enough original characters to tell the story.

“The Lord of Death” is the second book in the “The Age of Dawn” series by Everet Martins. Walter was able to live through his first encounter with the demon god Asebor. Asebor’s armor was removed, causing a swelling of his thirst for revenge. People are supposed to be unable to remain a human when they wear Cerumal armor. Asebor’s shadow looms large over the town of Zoria. Juzo, Walter’s best friend still has not been found, and is going down a dark path. Walter and Nyset are bot learning to use their newfound abilities with the help of their new teacher, named Baylan (of the Silver Tower) and a rogue wizard named Malek. The Wretched (Asebor’s generals) attack Midgaard, as the heroes fall into a nasty trap that takes them off the path to find Juzo. Walter is certain that Juzo is still living and he cannot force himself to give up on his buddy, but that means that they will still have to go through the east. In the east, rumor has it that there are hordes of Death Spawn. Midgaard’s Falcon Army is dispatched to take out the Death Spawn, the group is led by a horror known only by the moniker the Lord of Death.

Some readers really liked the way the author shows not just one perspective, but from four perspectives. The book, for some, blew away expectations, and provides a twist on a character trying to be a better person in the form of Juzo. The relationships that some of the characters have with each other progressed into new areas that helped developed those two characters. There was a lot of visualization of the gore from the battles that was very descriptive and helped with the mood of the battle scenes. Some felt “The Lord of Death” was a better book than “Stormcaller”, as the plot was more complicated and everything was more cleverly woven together.

Some readers did not like how dark the book was and they found the book to still use too much profanity, which did not help the story, and there was a lot of gory descriptions that really made some put the book down and did not pick up again.

Book Series In Order » Authors » Everet Martins